Monday, 14 April 2014

1940s slip stitch jumper - FINISHED!

Wasn’t this 1940s sweater a quick knit? From cast-on to put-on, just three months. That’s super-speedy for me.

Weaving in all the ends was a real faff (I felt the gap between stripes of the same colour was too great for me to carry unused colours up the side of the knitting), but the stripes did make it very easy to sew the seams up evenly. I adapted the sleeve placement slightly to match the stripes too. The original pattern said to place the sleeve seam about a quarter of an inch in front of the side seam, but I put them together.



When the jumper was finished, I did find it came up a fraction too short, despite me putting extra width in the front to stop it having to stretch too much. I think my body must be slightly longer than I realise (or perhaps my modern trousers are lower-waisted than I thought and I should buy some proper 1940s repro ones.) To remedy the shortness I picked up stitches all around the hem and knitted an extra inch of ribbing. You can see a faint line a couple of inches up from the hem. I think I'd have preferred the coloured section to be longer, so that's something I'll need to bear in mind if/when I knit another top with a contrasting midsection - I need to add a couple of inches to the body.

Unlike most of the vintage clothing I buy, which is usually a tad too fancy for everyday things, my knitted tops are ever so easy to wear. Along with my jewellery and handbags, they’re the easiest way for me to get a vintage look for work. Because of this, and the fact the accessories I wear for work are usually late 50s/early 60s, I did briefly consider knitting something from that era for work... but then I found a really nice 1940s Fair Isle pattern.  I have no idea what I'll knit next!


16 comments :

  1. Very, very cute! Also loving your hush puppy shoes x

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  2. Looks fabulous.II love the colours.x

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    1. Thank you. I'd bought them individually as part of a yarn-of-the-month club, with a view to making them into one garment. It's taken me ages to find the right pattern, though.

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  3. Very nice! If you fancy doing me one in either green or purple that would be great.....

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    1. Ha! I am such a slow knitter, you'd probably have changed size/shape/tastes by the time I'd finished. My navy cardi took lover a year and a half. That's why I never knit big garments for other people.

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  4. Lovely jumper, it looks so effective. Great choice of colours.

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  5. You are a very talented knitter - my mind boggles when I look at knitwear, surely it's made by either machines or elves?! So funny that you mentioned in this post already that your vintage purchases are 'a tad too fancy for everyday', perhaps the party dress thing IS a universal truth!! x

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    1. I reckon it's the reason vintage party dresses are so much easier to find than really nice daywear - they didn't get worn out as easily.

      I didn't learn to knit until I was 30, but one of the things that drove me was a desire to make my own 'repro' clothing that would fit. It's not that difficult, but it did take me a couple of years to hit a standard I was happy with.

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  6. Well done, excellent!
    Oh, Fair Isle, I love Fair Isle, the proper stuff, so hard to come by.

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    1. I have found *such* a nice pattern. Now I just need to find time to knit it...

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  7. Seeing this really makes me want to knit it now, what a great choice of colours. Working slip stitches is so soothing too. Just need to finish several half - knitted ones first!

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  8. I don't suppose you would share your pattern? Love it - and it looks so good on you! (Will flattery truly meant, get me anywhere ?)

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